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People in the Department of Art History

A goup of students and scholars engaged in conversation during an Art History Plastics Seminar Palmer Museum Tour

Our People

Faculty, staff, students, as well as external researchers and museum professionals all contribute to the vital exchange of ideas in this department.



Faculty


Heather McCune Bruhn

Heather McCune Bruhn

Assistant Teaching Professor of Art History | Learn More


Madhuri Desai's head shot.

Madhuri Desai

Associate Professor of Art History and Asian Studies | Learn More


James Harper

James Harper

Associate Research Professor of Art History, Director of Museum Studies | Learn More


Headshot of Penn State Associate Professor of Art History Nancy Locke

Nancy Locke

Associate Professor of Art History, Director of Graduate Studies in Art History | Learn More


Headshot of Penn State Professor of Art History, Head of the Department of Art History Elizabeth "Cassie" Mansfield

Elizabeth Mansfield

Professor of Art History, Head of the Department of Art History | Learn More


Headshot of Penn State Department of Art History Assistant Teaching Professor Naomi Pitamber

Naomi Pitamber

Assistant Teaching Professor | Learn More


Dr. Sarah K. Rich

Sarah K. Rich

Associate Professor of Art History | Learn More


Portrait of Ethan Robey

Ethan Robey

Associate Teaching Professor of Art History | Learn More

A group of students seated at and standing around a table with Professor Robin Thomas at the Penn State Libraries Eberly Family Special Collections.

Art History graduate student wearing a white lab coat and gloves mixing pigments in a laboratory.

Headshot of Penn State Professor of Art History and Anthropology Amara Solari

Amara Solari

Professor of Art History and Anthropology | Learn More


Dr. Chang Tan

Chang Tan

Assistant Professor of Art History and Asian Studies | Learn More


Headshot of Penn State Department of Art History Associate Professor Robin Thomas

Robin Thomas

Associate Professor of Art History and Architecture | Learn More


Associate Professor of Art History Elizabeth J. Walters's head shot.

Elizabeth J. Walters

Associate Professor of Art History | Learn More


Headshot of Penn State Associate Professor of Art History Craig Zabel

Craig Zabel

Associate Professor of Art History | Learn More


Headshot of Penn State Assistant Professor of Art History Daniel Zolli

Daniel Zolli

Assistant Professor of Art History | Learn More


TBA

Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Art History



Affiliate Faculty


Erin Coe

Associate Clinical Professor in Art History | Email


Denise Costanzo

Associate Professor of Architecture | Profile


Patrick McGrady

Charles V. Hallman Senior Curator Palmer Museum of Art | Email


Chris Reed

Distinguished Professor of English and Visual Culture, Art History, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies | Profile


Joyce Robinson

Assistant Director, Palmer Museum of Art | Email


Marica Tacconi

Associate Director and Professor, Musicology | Profile


Adam Thomas

Affiliate Assistant Professor of Art History & Curatorial Specialist | Profile


Stephanie Swindle Thomas

Affiliate Lecturer in Art History, Marketing Communications Specialist | Profile



Other Key Members of the Department

PhD Students

PhD Student Cohort


Arunima Addy

Arunima Addy

Degree: PhD in Architecture
Research Focus: South Asian architectural and urban history
Dissertation title: Diaspora of Indian Temple Architecture
Academic Adviser: Madhuri Desai
aua1169@psu.edu

Arunima Addy is currently a PhD candidate in Art History with dual title in Asian Studies. She has been a practicing architect in India, before joining the graduate program at Penn State. Arunima has her research interests in the relationship between the politics of religion and the construction of national identity, specifically with the rising sentiments of Hindu nationalism in India. She looks at visual representations in the built environment to understand how through architectural establishments religion is being used as a political tool to frame an image of the nation. For her dissertation, she is investigating the relationship between the politics of religion and nation-building particularly with respect to changing dynamics of Indian temple architecture in the neoliberal perspective where religion is becoming a global commodity.


Han Chen

Han Chen

Degree: PhD in Art History and Asian Studies
Research Focus: Modern and Contemporary Chinese and East Asian Art, history of collecting and exhibiting
Dissertation title: TBD
Academic Adviser: Chang Tan
hbc5231@psu.edu | CV

Han Chen is a PhD student specializing in the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese and East Asian art in the Euro-American context from the late nineteenth-century to the present day. She received her B.A. in 2016 and M.A. in 2019 from China Academy of Art. In 2021, she received her second M.A. from Penn State where she wrote her thesis entitled, “Selling China: A neglected encounter between Huo Mingzhi and France in the early twentieth century.” She has worked for the Palmer Museum of Art at Penn State and the Freer and Sackler Gallery of Art as a curatorial intern. Her current interest lies in employing machine learning to realize the image inpainting of photographs of Chinese antiques.


Olivia Crawford

Olivia Crawford

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: Nineteenth-century European Art and Architecture, Post-colonial Studies, Jewish Studies, Middle Eastern and North African Studies.
Dissertation title: TBD
Academic Adviser: Nancy Locke
ofc1@psu.edu

Olivia Crawford received her B.A. in Art History and French and Francophone Studies from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville in 2016 and her M.A. in Art History from Penn State University in 2018. She is currently a Ph.D. student in the Department of Art History at Penn State.

Her current research examines representations of colonial and metropolitan Jewish communities in French Orientalist art and architecture. Her dissertation prospectus is forthcoming.

Crawford lives and works in Knoxville, TN.


Karly Etz

Karly Etz


Arielle Fields


Katherine Flanagan


Laura Freitas Almeida

Laura Freitas Almeida


Emily Hagen

Emily Hagen

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: Seventeenth-century Italian architecture
Dissertation title: Pietro da Cortona’s Santi Luca e Martina: Rediscovered Relics and the Spectacle of Reform in Seventeenth-Century Rome
Academic Adviser: Robin Thomas
ekh15@psu.edu | CV

Emily Hagen is a Ph.D. candidate in art history studying early-modern Italian architecture with an interest in digital humanities. Her research focuses on churches devoted to martyrs’ relics in seventeenth-century Italy and investigates how architecture amplified the fiction of rediscovery in the context of early-modern Catholic reform.


Claire Heidenreich

Claire Heidenreich

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: Modern Art
Dissertation title: Apparition and Abstraction: Maurice Denis’ Visionary Catholicism
Academic Adviser: Nancy Locke
csh185@psu.edu

Claire is a doctoral candidate focusing on nineteenth-century French art. Her dissertation, “Apparition and Abstraction: Maurice Denis’ Visionary Catholicism,” is a revisionist history of the religious art of Denis, exploring how his work helps to rewrite narratives of the avant-garde in France. By focusing on popular piety, the resurgence of miraculous apparitions, and abstraction, she demonstrates how Denis strove to reinvent Catholic imagery in the late nineteenth century, and what his work means for the history of modernism.


Delnaaz Kharadi

Delnaaz Kharadi

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: Zoroastrian art and architecture, South Asian art and architecture
Dissertation title: TBD
Academic Adviser: Madhuri Desai
dfk5452@psu.edu | CV | Portfolio | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | ResearchGate | Academia.edu | Issuu

Delnaaz is a PhD student in South Asian and Pre-Islamic art history. She specializes in the architectural production, ritual use, cultural value and iconography of Zoroastrian art and architecture. She belongs to the Parsi community of India, an ethnic minority of Zoroastrian faith, whose long and complicated history influences both her scholarly interests and personal worldview. She looks into the Zoroastrian diaspora in India and traces their aesthetic roots back to Persia (modern day Iran) from where Zoroastrians migrated in 760 A.D. She builds a comparative analysis of Zoroastrian art and architecture with Classical Greek and Roman traditions and investigates their mutual influences. In this regard she particularly looks into Hegel’s ‘Philosophy of History’ where he identified Achaemenid Persians as the ‘first historical people’ and deliberated on ‘Zoroaster’s light’ as a predecessor of modern European thought, which helps her understand the construct of ‘Classical’ as a fundamental category of art, architecture and aesthetic history.


Katherine Koltiska


Hyoungee Kong

Hyoungee Kong

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: Japonisme, nineteenth-century French visual and material cultures, queer theory, gender and sexuality studies, history of Japanese photography
Dissertation title: Fleshly Japonisme: The Taste for Japan and Women’s Bodies in France 1871–1914
Academic Adviser: Nancy Locke
hxk276@psu.edu

Hyoungee Kong is a Ph.D. Candidate in Art History at Penn State. She is writing a dissertation on japonisme, or the Western taste for Japan, and its queer promises to women on reimagining their bodies and pleasures outside sexual and gender norms of late nineteenth-century France. Her research has been supported by fellowships from the Department of Art History and the Humanities Institute, Penn State; the Smithsonian Institute; and the Huntington Library.


Kyle Marini

Kyle Marini

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: Pre-Contact and Early Modern Latin America, Andean Textiles
Dissertation title: TBD
Academic Adviser: Amara Solari
kvm5948@psu.edu | Instagram | LinkedIn

Kyle is a PhD student in pre-contact and early modern Latin American art history. He specializes in the techniques of production, ritual use, and iconography of Inca textiles. He primarily researches ceremonial objects that have been destroyed to recover a more representative view of Inca visual culture before Spanish occupation of the Andes. This approach is in effort to decolonize modern understandings of the Inca developed from the study of objects that survived arduous extirpation campaigns throughout the Viceroyalty of Peru. By emphasizing objects erased from the archive, he reconstructs a history through the most integral Inca artifacts that ceased to exist precisely because of their visual power. Kyle is also a practicing artist, and he uses remaking as a methodology to envision these lost works and the technical processes used by their creators.


Jinny J McGill

Jinny J McGill


Andrea Middleton


Keri Mongelluzzo

Keri Mongelluzzo

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: History of Photography; Modern Art
Dissertation title: Bauhaus/Dream House: The Uncharted Surrealism of New Vision Photography
Academic Adviser: Nancy Locke
klm556@psu.edu | CV | LinkedIn | Academia.edu

Keri Mongelluzzo is a Ph.D. candidate specializing in the history of photography and modern art in Europe. Her dissertation, “Bauhaus/Dream House: The Uncharted Surrealism of New Vision Photography,” examines how French Surrealist sensibilities gained traction with transient artists associated with the Bauhaus, an innovative school of design in interwar Germany. Tracking key Bauhaus figures as they moved throughout Europe and across the Atlantic, “Bauhaus/Dream House” exposes their messy motivations for evoking surrealist themes amidst surges of nationalism and the rise of fascism. To date, Keri’s dissertation research has been supported by the Department of Art History and the Max Kade German-American Research Institute.

Keri’s broader research and curatorial interests in the histories and theories of photography span the medium’s history. She has written steadily on prominent photographers of the twentieth century, like Man Ray and Eugène Atget, presenting papers at the inaugural conference of the International Society for the Study of Surrealism at the Bucknell Humanities Center and the 24th Annual Graduate Student Symposium on the History of Art at the Barnes Foundation. In addition to curating a number of exhibitions of photography at the Palmer Museum of Art, including Myth Meets Modernism: The Manuel Álvarez Bravo Portfolio (2019) and Framing the City (2018), Keri piloted the museum’s first-ever virtual exhibition, Photography = Abstraction , using Google Slides at the onset of the pandemic and presented her work on this and her collaboration on subsequent virtual exhibitions and tours at the College Art Association Annual Conference in February 2021.


Alicia Skeath


Kenta Tokushige

Kenta Tokushige

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: Sixteenth-century Italian Military Architecture
Dissertation title: Being a Military Architect: Building Fortifications in Cosimo I de’ Medici’s Realm
Academic Adviser: Robin Thomas
kzt64@psu.edu

Kenta Tokushige is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at The Pennsylvania State University. His dissertation entitled, Being a ‘Military Architect’: Building Fortifications in Cosimo I de’ Medici’s Realm, studies the geopolitical role of fortification building under Cosimo I de’ Medici in the Grand Duchy of Tuscany in the latter half of the Cinquecento by looking at the design process of a fortification as a collaborative project by people of various social status and the way it was represented in multiple forms of art upon its completion. His research traces the correspondence between the patrons, local governors, and architects regarding the decision-making process and examines the intentions of each individual. Additionally, he is exploring the representation and the circulation of information after the completion of the fortification in relation to the espionage of military information.

His research has been supported by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and the Susan W. and Thomas A. Schwartz Endowed Fellowship for Dissertation Research.

He completed his B.Arch. and M.A. in Architecture at Waseda University and Master of Architectural History at University of Virginia.


Holli Turner

Holli Turner

Degree: PhD in Art History
Research Focus: Art of Early Modern Southern Europe and Colonial Latin America, the materials and materiality of art, technical art history, theories and practices of conservation, race, and representation in art, decolonial practices in art history
Dissertation title: TBD
Academic Adviser: Daniel Zolli
Personal website | hmt5287@psu.edu

Holli M. Turner is a doctoral student specializing in early modern art, with a focus on the art of Italy, Spain, and the Americas. Her dissertation will examine the colonial implications of color – broadly understood – in the Venetian artist Titian’s paintings for the Spanish monarchy. This project knits together several core concerns of her work: the materials and materiality of art; the representation of race and ethnicity in art; and the interpretive importance of invisible labor, and laborers, to art’s history. In Summer 2021, Holli is serving as the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Research Fellow in Penn State’s Art History department, where she is developing a digital humanities project that tracks Titian’s pigments and their origins.

Holli is a Virginia native that was trained in art history and graphic design before embarking on doctoral study. Her research interests also stem from her own artistry. In her spare time, she paints, illustrates, and creates works through traditional and digital media.


Olga Zaikina


MA Students

MA Student Cohort


Belinda Casey


Nicole Jozwik

Nicole Jozwik

Degree: MA in Art History
Research Focus: Latin American Art
Academic Adviser: Amara Solari
nzj85@psu.edu

Nicole is an MA candidate studying the religious artwork of the Early Modern Andes. She approaches her research by merging Art Historical methodology with Catholic theology. She aims to uncover how indigenous religious identities persisted and changed in the midst of Spanish colonization and evangelization. Her work illustrates how Andean peoples adapted and incorporated select Catholic elements into their religious and artistic practices. Her current interests lie in hagiographic artworks, sense perception, and sacred materiality.


Victoria Kenyon

Victoria Kenyon

Degree: MA in Art History
Research Focus: Nineteenth-century American painting and photography, with special interest in the intersections of art, science, and magic, as well as topics related to military and medical history.
Academic Adviser: Ethan Robey
vsk5085@psu.edu | CV | LinkedIn

Victoria S. Kenyon is a second year MA candidate studying under Dr. Ethan Robey. Her main area of research interest is in nineteenth-century American painting and photography. Specifically, she is interested in how photography and painting intersected with other developments in the nineteenth century, including skepticism of visual culture, conceptions of the supernatural, and the changing nature of warfare and medical practice.

Victoria graduated from Auburn University at Montgomery in 2018, earning a BA in History (minor in Art History) and Museum Studies certificate. Much of her past work has been centered on military history, especially the Civil War and World Wars. Her prize-winning capstone undergraduate paper was “Southern Hospitality: Confederate Women Nurses in the Civil War,” which highlighted the way that conflict changed gender roles and medical practice in the South. Before coming to Penn State, she held positions at institutions including the Alabama Department of Archives and History, Philadelphia Museum of Art (where she researched Thomas Eakins), Historic Deerfield, and The F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum.


Caroline Koch

Caroline Koch

Degree: MA in Art History
Research Focus: Early Modern European art, Ancient Greek art
cek5624@psu.edu | Instagram | Facebook | LinkedIn

Caroline is a MA student who specializes in Ancient Greek and Early Modern European art, namely the periods from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Period and Impressionism. She has extensive experience in museums, and aims to promote ethical acquisition and education practices across the industry. She studied in Greece in 2019, where she closely analyzed the issues of looting and forgeries. In her studies, she aims to connect the social and political issues of artists’ lives to their work, and highlight the use of art as a medium of communication to the general public, in addition to exclusive audiences. Additionally, she seeks to further her research into Minoan religious art, the role of nature in ceremonies, and how social and class divisions manifested in these practices.


Maialen Martinez

Maialen Martinez

Degree: MA in Art History
Research Focus: Premodern/Modern European Art
mbm6754@psu.edu | CV | Instagram | LinkedIn

Maialen Martinez is a first year Art History MA student from San Sebastian, Spain. She graduated Summa Cum Laude with honors from Hobart and William Smith Colleges in 2021 with a degree in History and Art History. During her senior year, she completed a thesis Medieval Amulets: Seeking Protection with Wearable Art for which she gained honorary distinctions. Her research focused on jewels and badges dated to the Middle Ages that were worn for protection. Martinez is also interested in European painting and sculpture from premodern times to contemporary art. She is especially interested how artists reflect on history and their predecessors to communicate with the audiences.

During undergraduate level Martinez played a key role in the William Smith soccer defense, reaching the National Championship. She is a two-time CoSIDA Academic All-District, and CoSIDA Academic All-American her senior year. She was also tabbed Scholar Player of the Year 2019 and numerous other soccer related distinctions. Martinez is also a member of Phi Beta Kappa society.


Amy Orner

Amy Orner

Degree: MA in Art History
Research Focus: Italian and British Baroque painting, Artemisia Gentileschi
Academic Adviser: Robin Thomas
aeo5185@psu.edu | LinkedIn

Amy is an MA student studying Early Modern painting with Dr. Robin Thomas. She specializes in the Italian and English Baroque, and the life and works of Artemisia Gentileschi. Her research questions focus on the social and political influences on the production of art, the personal motivations of an artist, and the appreciation of Italian artists by the Stuart Courts of Britain. She currently works with the Palmer Museum of Art at Penn State.

Before coming to Penn State, Amy held positions at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., and Lauriston Castle in Edinburgh, Scotland. She received her B.A. from Juniata College in 2017 in Museum Studies/Art History, graduating with honors. At Juniata College, she conducted her independent research on differing Baroque depictions of the apocryphal story of Judith of Bethulia.


Sophia Ileana Yaniger

Sophia Ileana Yaniger

Degree: MA in Art History
Research Focus: Late Medieval Italy, Early Modern Italy, 14th century Florence
Academic Adviser: Daniel Zolli
siy5210@psu.edu

Sophia is an MA student studying the intersection of the Late Medieval and Early Modern world in Italy. She is interested in the characterization of artists by 14th century writer Franco Sacchetti. In her thesis, she will explore wit and humor in visual and literary traditions in Florence.

In 2020, Sophia received her BA in Art History from Kutztown University and graduated summa cum laude. During her undergraduate studies she interned with Allentown Art Museum, where she developed a tour for high school students that explores 14th-16th century artists’ workshop materials and practices.

In addition to her research, Sophia is a Teaching Assistant for Penn State. She deeply values the interpersonal connections of education and the cultivation of young minds. After receiving her MA from Penn State in 2022, she plans to obtain certification to teach secondary education Social Studies.


Staff

Art History Staff


Catherine Adams

Assistant Visual Resources Curator | cda122@psu.edu


Carolyn Lucarelli

Visual Resources Curator | cjl8@psu.edu


Diana Malcom

Administrative Support Assistant | dbw102@psu.edu


Erica Nodell

Administrative Support Coordinator | exn30@psu.edu

Retired + Emeritus Faculty

Retired + Emeritus Faculty


Anthony Cutler

Evan Pugh University Professor Emeritus in Art History; Fellow Emeritus, Institute for the Arts and Humanities | axc6@psu.edu
Specialization: Late Antique and Byzantine Art


William Dewey

Associate Teaching Professor Emeritus | wjd14@psu.edu
Specialization: African, African Diaspora and Oceanic Art


Roland Fleischer

Professor Emeritus of Art History; Fellow Emeritus, Institute for the Arts and Humanities | ref2@psu.edu
Specialization: Northern Renaissance and Baroque: American Colonial


Charlotte Houghton

Associate Professor Emerita of Art History | cmh17@psu.edu
Specialization: Northern European Art, 1400-1750


Jeanne Porter

Associate Professor Emerita of Art History | jcp1@psu.edu
Specialization: Southern Baroque Art


Elizabeth Bradford Smith

Associate Professor Emerita of Art History | exs11@psu.edu
Specialization: Western Medieval Art and Architecture

Faculty Spotlight

Fragile religious mural painted by Christianized Maya artists in Yucatán, Mexico
Fragile religious mural painted by Christianized Maya artists in Yucatán, Mexico

Amara Solari

Professor of Art History and Anthropology

Amara Solari teaches courses in Latin American art from the pre-Columbian through the colonial period. Her research focuses on processes of cultural, visual, and theological interchange between indigenous groups and Spanish settlers of New Spain. She recently received a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support of her research project, “Maya Christian Murals of Yucatán: Indigenous Catholicism in Early Modern New Spain,” which focuses on fragile religious murals painted by Christianized Maya artists in Yucatán, Mexico, between 1550 and 1750.

Amara Solari